Sunday, June 1

We again had two lectures this morning: 1) Celtic Myth and Reality. The Kingdom of Dumnonia, and 2) The Imposition of English Rule. Cornwell in the Middle Ages. Again they were outstanding. Andrew is very careful not to just give out the standard tourist talk, and is very up to date on current historical research.

A major point he made is that DNA analysis had confirmed that the ancestry of the British people has changed little since the earliest times. This is counter to usual notions that Celtic, and later Germanic, invaders had overwhelmed the original population.

After the lectures we had a buffet lunch at the hotel and then a guided walk around Penzance, with many stops for talks by Andrew. Nothing very momentous but, with Andrew's commentary, interersting. Later he took someof the group on a walk to Newlyn, the fishing village just west of Penzance, but we passed up that opportuity.

I was impressed that the city had put up a statue of Sir Humphry Day, the famous chemist, and that there was even a pub named after him. He was born in Penzance and had invented the Davy safety lamp for miners.

 


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